Texas County voters will soon receive voter registration cards in the mail. 

Updated at 8:55 a.m.: Texas County voters swept three Republicans into county office Tuesday – following a trend that saw state and national GOP candidates win from the courthouse to Washington. In a moderate turnout, county residents rode the tide of voter discontent.

About 52 percent of the county’s voters – 8,350 – traveled to 10 precincts.

The closest county race was between the incumbent recorder of deeds, Phyllis Staley, a Democrat, and Susan Warkentin, a Republican. Warkentin took eight of 10 precincts to win 4,298-3,817. Staley, who opted to run for the office after it and the circuit clerk’s office were split, won at Houston and Licking.

At the Houston precinct, about 52 percent of the registered voters- 1,877 – arrived at the Houston Storm Shelter.

Succeeding Staley as circuit clerk is Republican Marci Mosley, who won handily over Rita Williams, a Democrat, 5,305-2,744.

Republican Fred Stenger won over Mike Impey, a Democrat, for county presiding commissioner. The vote was 5,244-2,807.

Both Mosley and Stenger won in every county precinct.

All of the county offices are four-year terms.

Color it red: As in Missouri, county voters supported Roy Blunt for the U.S. Senate and Tom Schweich for state auditor. Blunt, a Republican, won easily over Democrat Robin Carnahan, 5,371-2,268, in the race to replace retiring U.S. Sen. Christopher “Kit” Bond, a Republican. Democrats held the U.S. Senate; Republicans took control of the U.S. House.

Schweich also picked up broad support over incumbent State Auditor Susan Montee, a Democrat, 4,875-2,916. He also won statewide.

In the race for Missouri’s 8th congressional seat, Rep. Jo Ann Emerson easily defeated Tommy Sowers of Rolla in her most serious challenge since taking office 14 years ago. “She and I both agree that now is the time to set aside our differences and to work together for the future of Missouri,” said Sowers following a call to Emerson.

Through four economic recessions, five presidents and 17 elections, Democratic Rep. Ike Skelton prevailed at the ballot box by building a reputation as a military expert and social conservative. Until now.

Missouri voters ousted the 78-year-old chairman of the House Armed Services Committee in favor of Republican Vicky Hartzler, a former home economics teacher and state lawmaker who cast Skelton as an ally of President Barack Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Skelton served Texas County residents during a part of his tenure.

Texas County voters followed other voters in the state. The exception was the most controversial issue – a measure regulating dog breeders that agriculture interests said would hurt farmers — was soundly defeated in the county, 6,559-1,626. It won statewide with about 51.6 percent of the vote.

Three constitutional measures also found favor with county voters: Amendment 1 that called for the election of some assessors in the state won 5,549-2,061. Amendment 2 gives a tax break to ex-POWs also gained support, 4,817-3,111. County voters clearly said they didn’t want to pay taxes on home sales: 6,971-1,123.

Voters also overwhelmingly supported a measure to require continued approval for earnings taxes in Kansas City and St. Louis: 6,130-1,846.

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Updated at 6:41 a.m.: Texas County voters swept three Republicans into county office – following a trend that saw state and national GOP candidates swept into office from the courthouse to Washington. In a moderate turnout, county residents cast ballots for three new county officials.

About 52 percent of the county’s voters – 8,350 – traveled to 10 precincts.

The closest county race was between the incumbent recorder of deeds, Phyllis Staley, a Democrat, and Susan Warkentin, a Republican. Warkentin took eight of 10 precincts to win 4,298-3,817. Staley, who opted to run for the office after it and the circuit clerk’s office were split, won at Houston and Licking.

At the Houston precinct, about 52 percent – 1,877 – voted.

Succeeding Staley as circuit clerk is Republican Marci Mosley, who won handily over Rita Williams, a Democrat, 5,305-2,744.

Republican Fred Stenger won over Mike Impey, a Democrat, for county presiding commissioner. The vote was 5,244-2,807.

Both Mosley and Stenger won in each of the county’s precincts.

All the county offices are four-year terms.

Complete coverage and an election table coming in the Herald, which will be available early Wednesday afternoon.

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Earlier: A higher than expected voter turnout is reported across the state today.

Precinct workers at Houston were reporting a constant stream of voters coming to the Houston Storm Shelter, the polling location.

More than 600 cast an absentee ballot in the county.

About 50 percent had been predicted to vote.

On the local level, voters will select a new presiding commissioner. Seeking the office vacated by incumbent Don Shelhammer, a Republican, are David M. “Mike” Impey, a Democrat, and Fred W. Stenger, a Republican.

Two court employees are seeking to replace Circuit Clerk Phyllis Staley, who opted to run as recorder of deeds after the offices were split by the county commission. They are Rita A. Williams, a Democrat, and Marci Mosley, a Republican.

Seeking the recorder of deeds office is incumbent Staley, a Democrat, and Susan Elmore Warkentin, a Republican.

Running unopposed are State Reps. Don Wells, R-Cabool, and Tony Dugger, R-Hartville; Doug Gaston, associate judge, Republican; Donald R. “Don” Troutman, county clerk, Democrat; and Mike Anderson, county prosecutor, Republican. Mary Sheffield is unopposed in the 25th Judicial Circuit as circuit judge.

Statewide, voters will decide who will replace Republican Christopher “Kit” Bond in the U.S. Senate. The frontrunners are Republican Roy Blunt, a southwest Missouri congressman, and Democrat Robin Carnahan, secretary of state.

Incumbent Susan Montee, a Democrat, is challenged by Republican Tom Schweich.

In the 8th Congressional District, Democrat Tommy Sowers is attempting to upset 14-year veteran Jo Ann Emerson, a Republican.

Three constitutional measures also appear. One would require assessors to be elected in all counties with the charter form of government. Another would prevent a new tax when homes sell. A third deals with tax breaks for POWs.

Proposition A would require a vote for earnings taxes. Proposition B would require oversight of dog breeders, but opponents worry about its implications on agriculture.

Voters also will decide whether to retain three judges.

PDF: Sample ballot

Voter turnout chart

PDF: Texas County election returns

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