Pardons

Missouri’s outgoing Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon is pardoning 12 more people.

Nixon on Friday announced the pardons to a dozen men convicted of theft and drug-related crimes, such as selling cocaine.

They’ve since found jobs or retired. One now mentors troubled youth, and another is active in his church.

The pardons come in Nixon’s final stretch as governor before he leaves office in January. He was barred by term limits from seeking re-election.

During Nixon’s nearly eight years as governor, he’s granted 88 pardons and commuted the sentences of three incarcerated offenders.

Granting a pardon restores rights but doesn’t expunge criminal records. Commutations shorten sentences.

The people granted pardons, according to a press release: 

•Bernard Curtis, who served three months in the Department of Corrections and received a one-year term of probation after being convicted of second-degree burglary in 1980 in St. Louis City. Curtis has maintained gainful employment.

GOV. JAY NIXON

•Richard Crow, who was discharged early from a five-year term of probation after pleading guilty to sale of a controlled substance in 1974 in St. Louis County. Crow has maintained gainful employment in the real estate industry.

•John Baker, who completed a five-year term of probation after being convicted of sale of cocaine in 1992 in Camden County. Baker has maintained gainful employment and serves as a mentor for troubled youth.

•Michael Sullwold, who completed a five-year term of probation for two counts of sale of marijuana in 1982 in Buchanan County. Sullwold recently retired after 30 years of service at the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

•Mark Stroud, who was discharged early from a five-year term of probation after being convicted of sale of marijuana in 1996 in Lewis County. Stroud has maintained gainful employment.

•James Medley, who completed a three-year term of probation after being convicted of possession of marijuana in 1985 in Greene County. Medley has maintained gainful employment and is active in his church.

•David McCarthy, who completed a two-year term of probation for receiving stolen property in 1979 in Howell County. McCarthy has maintained gainful employment in the logging industry.

•Eugene Atterberry, who completed a five-year term of probation after being convicted of burglary and stealing in 1970 in Texas County. Atterberry retired in 2012 after 30 years of service in the Department of Defense.

•Malta Stepp, Jr., who served 14 months in the Department of Corrections for Burglary in 1969 in Stoddard County. Stepp, a Vietnam veteran, resides in Arkansas and maintained gainful employment before retiring in 2012.

•Jeffrey Hargrove, who served four months in the Department of Corrections and received a five-year term of probation for receiving stolen property in 1999 in Buchanan County. Hargrove has since received his Master’s Degree and maintains gainful employment.

•Donnie Yantis, who completed a two-year term of probation for possession of a controlled substance in 1990 in Shelby County. Yantis owns an excavating business and cattle farm.

•Granger Layman, who completed a six-month term of probation for stealing in 1997 in Jasper County. Layman has maintained gainful employment and works in the meat-packing industry.

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